RIM Begins Showing New BlackBerry Handsets to Wireless Carriers

Windows Phone Marketplace Beats Android Market to 50,000 Apps


Though it’s still dwarfed by Apple’s App Store and Google’s Android Market, Microsoft’s Windows Phone Marketplace has been posting some decent growth lately. In mid-November, it hit the 40,000 app milestone, and now, a little over a month later, it’s hit another.
According to All About Windows Phone, which tracks Windows Phone app submissions, the Marketplace has seen more than 50,000 apps published to it — 50,126, to be exact.
Notably, Windows Phone reached that 50,000 app milestone in 14 months, faster than Android, Symbian, or BlackBerry (but slower than iOS, which hit that mark in about a year).


Read More…

Windows Phone Marketplace Beats Android Market to 50,000 Apps

Though it’s still dwarfed by Apple’s App Store and Google’s Android Market, Microsoft’s Windows Phone Marketplace has been posting some decent growth lately. In mid-November, it hit the 40,000 app milestone, and now, a little over a month later, it’s hit another.

According to All About Windows Phone, which tracks Windows Phone app submissions, the Marketplace has seen more than 50,000 apps published to it — 50,126, to be exact.

Notably, Windows Phone reached that 50,000 app milestone in 14 months, faster than Android, Symbian, or BlackBerry (but slower than iOS, which hit that mark in about a year).

Read More…

splatf:

The rise and fall of RIM
Top 10 Mobile Products of 2011
Looking back on 2011, it may be remembered as The Year Of Mobile. Sure, iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Windows Phone and all the other platforms existed in previous years but historians will look back at 2011 and say that it was the year that the way an entire populace interacts with information fundamentally changed. Mobile is not just for the early adopters anymore. Smartphones are everywhere.
What made waves in the mobile realm this year? We take a look in our third installment of ReadWriteWeb’s top products of the year.

Top 10 Mobile Products of 2011

Looking back on 2011, it may be remembered as The Year Of Mobile. Sure, iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Windows Phone and all the other platforms existed in previous years but historians will look back at 2011 and say that it was the year that the way an entire populace interacts with information fundamentally changed. Mobile is not just for the early adopters anymore. Smartphones are everywhere.

What made waves in the mobile realm this year? We take a look in our third installment of ReadWriteWeb’s top products of the year.

iPad Rival Gets Staggering Price Reduction

Why can’t any of them compete?


On Monday, Research In Motion announced that it is slashing the price of its BlackBerry PlayBook tablet. For a limited time the device will be available for $199 at Best Buy, Wireless Giant, Staples, OfficeMax, Office Depot, Radio Shack and Wal-Mart. The discounted price hadn’t gone into effect when CNET reported the story on Monday, and as of this writing only Best Buy and Staples had rolled out the deal for a $199 16GB PlayBook on their websites. OfficeMax, Wal-Mart and Radio Shack were listing the PlayBook at the higher price, and Wireless Giant’s website didn’t have the PlayBook listed…

Android Still Most Popular Smartphone OS, iOS Holds Steady In Second Place
(via Techcrunch)
According to new data from Nielsen, Android has continued to pick up steam in the United States, and retains its crown as the most-used smartphone OS during Q3 2011. Google’s mobile OS now accounts for 43% of U.S. smartphones, up from the 39% we saw back in July. Apple’s iOS, on the other hand, has remained lock-steady at 28% this whole time, putting it at a distant second.
Despite their lack of growth on the software front, Apple still rules the roost when it comes to hardware. Apple’s iPhones are used by a full 28% of all smartphone customers, making them the top manufacturer for yet another quarter.
Meanwhile, use of RIM’s BlackBerry OS has slowly begun to slip: while it previously accounted for 20% of the smartphone OS market, it now accounts for 18%. Certainly not a drastic dip, but the Q3 report doesn’t take into account some of the more recent unpleasantness that the folks in Waterloo have been dealing with.
Surprisingly, Windows Phone’s adoption rate seems to have slowed down as well, as it now only accounts for 7% of smartphones, down from the 9% figure we saw last time. Microsoft and Nokia certainly aim to change that come next year, but we’ll soon see how well their grand designs pan out.
The Q3 results are definitely interesting, but I think the Q4 report is really the one to look out for. New hardware (and OS) announcements are coming at a blistering pace, and it’ll be a hoot to see how the landscape changes after the holiday retail wars have come and gone.

Android Still Most Popular Smartphone OS, iOS Holds Steady In Second Place

(via Techcrunch)

According to new data from Nielsen, Android has continued to pick up steam in the United States, and retains its crown as the most-used smartphone OS during Q3 2011. Google’s mobile OS now accounts for 43% of U.S. smartphones, up from the 39% we saw back in July. Apple’s iOS, on the other hand, has remained lock-steady at 28% this whole time, putting it at a distant second.

Despite their lack of growth on the software front, Apple still rules the roost when it comes to hardware. Apple’s iPhones are used by a full 28% of all smartphone customers, making them the top manufacturer for yet another quarter.

Meanwhile, use of RIM’s BlackBerry OS has slowly begun to slip: while it previously accounted for 20% of the smartphone OS market, it now accounts for 18%. Certainly not a drastic dip, but the Q3 report doesn’t take into account some of the more recent unpleasantness that the folks in Waterloo have been dealing with.

Surprisingly, Windows Phone’s adoption rate seems to have slowed down as well, as it now only accounts for 7% of smartphones, down from the 9% figure we saw last time. Microsoft and Nokia certainly aim to change that come next year, but we’ll soon see how well their grand designs pan out.

The Q3 results are definitely interesting, but I think the Q4 report is really the one to look out for. New hardware (and OS) announcements are coming at a blistering pace, and it’ll be a hoot to see how the landscape changes after the holiday retail wars have come and gone.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/elizabethwoyke/2011/11/08/rim-plans-big-push-for-nfc-enabled-blackberry-apps/

Takeaway: A new analyst report suggests that Android will catch BlackBerry in enterprise smartphone sales by 2016. Here’s why it may be wrong.

A new report from research firm Ovum suggests that over the next five years Android will pull even with BlackBerry in terms of smartphone sales to the enterprise — in other words, the devices that businesses purchase in order to hand out to employees and run off of the corporate telecom account.

Our colleagues at Silicon.com have a summary of the Ovum report:

“Google’s mobile OS will account for 26 per cent of corporate smartphone shipments in 2016, growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 21 per cent. While BlackBerry will remain the dominant smartphone player among business users over the next five years - thanks to strong device management and security capabilities making it ‘a favourite with IT departments’ - it will only retain this lead by a whisker-thin margin, according to research by Ovum - accounting for 27 per cent of the market in 2016. …

Fandroids say that iPhones, Blackberries and Windows Phones are way too expensive. Anyone can buy a cheaper Android! Now a study covering 600,000 support calls has found that these cheap Androids are exactly that: Cheap. And cheap phones break.

Repairs to Android smartphones cost wireless carriers $2 billion per year according to a new year-long WDS study that tracked 600,000 support calls around the globe. Android’s popularity and the introduction of a number of low-cost smartphones has put a strain on the wireless business model, WDS noted in its report. “Deployment by more than 25 OEMs and lower-cost product coming to market is leading to higher than average rates of hardware failures and, in turn, return and repair costs.” 12.6% of all technical support calls related to Android in the study were for hardware failures related to the touchscreen, buttons, speakers, microphones and battery performance. Just 9.3% of Windows Phone, 8% of iOS calls and 5.5% of BlackBerry calls were related to hardware failures. Read on for more.